Day 8: Finishing Up

Today we continued to pose and program the robots, and create the art for the stage.  At this point in the program, the kids know their way around the robots.  They are gentle when they manipulate the robots, and are comfortable programming them to deliver their lines.

Each block of text (along with the movement) will be stored in its own timeline.  Once we have all of the individual timelines for a robot, we will create the final program for that robot.  Some of the roles were easier to put together than others.  For example, “Christopher” and “Denise” will be playing virtual pong throughout the skit, so their movements involve an infinite loop of random arm movements that look like they are hitting a ball back and forth.  They have a few lines of dialogue in the skit, but we didn’t have to create any deliberate movements outside of the pong gestures.

“Daniel” will be describing outdoor sports (mentioning football and archery, and then describing how to play baseball in more detail).  That series of movements took some effort to build, and the final result was outstanding.  “Gini” and “Bobbi” are the robots visiting from Minneapolis.  They will be locking their convertible car, and trying to figure out where to go for the Robot Theater Summer Camp.  They will be walking up to the other robots to ask for help.  “Gini” will be describing how to make a dump cake, and “Bobbi” will be talking about the winter sports that she plays.  “Alberto” will go into detail about gardening.  The kids in the camp created all of this dialogue and movement.

Programming Alberto's moves
Programming Alberto’s moves
Working out Amanda's movements
Working out Amanda’s movements
Getting Amanda's movements coded
Getting Amanda’s movements coded
Working on the background art
Working on the background art
Analog creativity
Analog creativity
Creating Daniel's movements
Creating Daniel’s movements
Ini starts the show, and had a lot of lines in the skit
Gini starts the show, and had a lot of lines in the skit

Almost Finished!

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Day 7: Creating the Individual Pieces

The kids read through the overall script, but there are several components that still need to be written.  The kids will write a description of how to make a “dump cake”, various outdoor sports (winter and non-winter) that they enjoy playing, and things that are related to gardening.  We also need to create deliberate gestures for when the robots are speaking their other lines in the skit.  Then we need to create the programs that enable the robots deliver their lines (with appropriate gestures).  Finally, we need to put it all together into one large “conversation program” for each robot.

We started out the day by writing some of the descriptions that will be used in the skit.  Then some kids started programming the dialogue, and others started working on the backdrops for when the robots perform the skit.  This was a great day for creative juices to flow.  Putting on a robot theater performance involves more than just writing computer programs.  There is writing, posing, programming, drawing, and staging to be done.

Starting to draw
Starting to draw
Collaboration
Collaboration
Creating the movements
Creating the movements
Creating movements for outdoor sports for Daniel
Creating movements for outdoor sports for Daniel
Coding the lines and gestures for Gini's role
Coding the lines and gestures for Gini’s role
Putting Art into STEM makes STEAM!
Putting Art into STEM makes STEAM!